Jimmy Can’t Dance

Jimmy Can’t Dance is a Jazz and Blues club located in beautiful downtown Louisville, Kentucky on 7th street.

My young friend Victoria and I Ubered our way down there to drink with the grown-ups  and listened to the jazz. Nate Lopez and his Eight String were playing for our listening enjoyment and I must say they exceeded our expectations.

Jimmy Cant dance

So when I ordered our drinks I asked the girl back of the bar would it be OK to teach Jimmy to Dance? She said no, I didn’t say Jimmy didn’t know how to dance, I said Jimmy can’t dance. There’s a difference. That got me to thinking, why can’t Jimmy dance? Maybe Jimmy got no legs. Maybe Jimmy dead. Maybe Jimmy just don’t exist. That’s what I said. But one thing’s for sure. Jimmy can’t dance. But he sure plays a mean eight sting guitar!

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Nate Lopez and Nioshi Jackson

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Nate Lopez

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Honey Grace

 

 

Confederate Monument Vandalized

John Breckinridge Castleman

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This monument represents John Breckinridge Castleman, a confederate officer (1841-1918). It stands in the Cherokee Triangle, in Louisville, Kentucky. It was privately commissioned in 1913. The monument was vandalized and subsequently conserved on multiple occasion notably in 1996, and in 2017, and most recently on February 7, 2018. The City of Louisville is currently holding meetings to garner public sentiment for guidance as to the final fate of this monument.

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House the Homeless

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No Borders

 

Single Black Female

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I was having breakfast in one of my favorite hamburger joints, Burger Boy, down on Burnett, when I looked up from the book I was reading and I noticed a single black female, short in stature, with long black hair and fake eyelashes sitting with her back to me at the lunch counter. She was wearing a black ball cap and a black leather jacket. The jacket had silver studs on the collar and along the half circle of each of the shoulders. She had on tight blue jeans and brown suede fringed moccasins that went half way up her well-shaped calves. There was a red leather purse with a gold chain sitting on the counter in front of her.

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She kept glancing at her cell phone as she patiently waited for her food too to arrive. She got it to go. When it came, she picked up the white plastic bag the waitress had placed before her and she stepped away from the counter.

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It was then that I witnessed the full effect of her great beauty as her face came into full view. She then made her way to the front door and departed. It was a moment.

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KMAC Couture

Launch Party

KMAC Couture is a wearable art runway show presented by KMAC Museum In Louisville, Kentucky each April. This event offers a unique way to experience the Museum.

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Everything Couture Here?

I walked into the party

my scarf it was apricot

I had one eye in the viewfinder

and the other rubbering around the room

the girls in their lavish dresses

were on display for all to see

A cupcake is a tasty treat

and the eye candy looked so sweet…

the gates of heaven must be open

I think I saw an angel just walk by.

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KMAC Museum, 715 W, Main Street, Louisville, Kentucky

All photos by Benn Bell

 

Walking in the Hood on a Snowy Day

What hood this is I think I know.

I walk and think while the hood fills up with snow.

Old Louisville is where I walk around

As the snow flakes fall gently to the ground

I linger here a while

And what I see makes me smile

The pretty little houses with the snow piled high

I  take a few pictures to remember by.

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The North Face

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Which Way did they go?

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Walking in the Hood on a Snowy Day

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Now that’s a horse of a different color

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Pegasus

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Believe

 

 

 

Christmas Cheer

Last night I went to a party put on by the Third Street Association here in Louisville, Kentucky. It was in a beautiful old Victorian home. For while I thought I was lost in the Ingmar Bergman film, Fanny and Alexander or the Short Story The Dead, by James Joyce. Such was the beauty of the home I went to and the magical quality of the experience.

Both the stories were about a Christmas celebration among family and friends in spacious beautiful old homes decorated for the occasion. Both stories were a celebration of the love of family and friends and the human nature we are all heir too.

The House on Third was full of great Christmas cheer, fun, and laughter.

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Third Street Association – Photo by Benn Bell

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Fanny and Alexander a Film by Ingmar Bergman

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Third Street – Louisville

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Don’t shoot me I’m the piano player

Fanny and Alexander

From the Movie Fannie and Alexander

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Third Street

Fann and A

From the Movie Fanny and Alexander

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Third Street

The Dead

From the Movie The Dead Directed by John Houston

 

“His soul swooned softly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.”

-James Joyce from his short story, The Dead

THE COLORS OF FALL

Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.

-Albert Camus

So, I decided to take a walk in the park, This is what I saw:

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Cherokee Park, Louisville, Kentucky

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Cherokee Park

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Cherokee Park, Louisville, Kentucky

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Cherokee Park, Louisville, Kentucky

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Pavilion at the Top of Dog Hill

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Cherokee park, Louisville, Kentucky

PICASSO

Genius Loves Company

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Picasso Exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Picasso Mania

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The Studio, Currently on display at the Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky

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Untitled Picasso Sculpture in Daley Plaza in Chicago

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Woman, Chicago Art Institute

Photo:  Benn Bell  Sculpture:  Picasso  Model: Ginger Bell

All Photos by Benn Bell

HENRY IV

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Is There Free Will?

There is in Louisville, Kentucky. You can find Free Will in Central Park, home of the country’s longest running Free Shakespeare in the Park.

Last night Kentucky Shakespeare, spearheaded by managing producer Matt Wallace, mounted another successful production of one of the bard’s history plays: Henry IV.

Directed by Amy Attaway and acted by a fine ensemble cast it was sight to behold and a treat to listen to. Only a few minor quibbles. Couple of times the mics seemed to fall into a dead zone causing the actor’s voices to drop, a missed light cue or two, and a couple of slow entrances, but these are minor flaws in an otherwise outstanding performance.

Henry IV is one of my favorites among many of Shakespeare’s plays. It has some of his best lines and it introduces one of the greatest characters of all time, Falstaff. Some have said that Falstaff is a stand in for Shakespeare himself and have cited the similarity in their names: Fall/staff, Shake/speare.

Harold Bloom writing in his, Shakespeare, The Invention of the Human, quotes Hegel: “Shakespeare made his best characters free artists of themselves.” The freest of them all are Hamlet and Falstaff because they are they are the most intelligent of Shakespeare’s persons. Falstaff certainly shows his proclivity for eating, drinking, and fornicating and basically being a social deviant.

Anthony Burgess suggests that the Falstaffian spirit is a great sustainer of civilization. It disappears when the state is too powerful. There is little of Falstaff’s spirit in the world today. As the power of the state expands, what is left will be liquidated.

But wait…don’t banish Falstaff, not sweet, kind Jack Falstaff, true Jack Fallstaff, valiant Jack Falstaff, old Falstaff, banish plump Jack and banish all the world.

Keep Will Free!

 

 

 

Star Date 20180616

Journal Entry

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2018 is turning out to be a pretty good year for films. Although the ones I most recently really liked were actually released in 2017 and are just now getting here: Let the Sunshine In and First Reformed (reviews to follow). After all, Louisville is just a lonely outpost at the edge of civilization. The British have a saying about being posted to such a station: Never drink before dark, but never go to bed quite sober either. Good advice.