TIME ENOUGH FOR LOVE

 

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I have crossed oceans of time

To be with you

There must be

Time enough for love….

Two hundred years for each breast

A thousand for the rest

And if we find rubies by the Rhine

So much better love can find

The way to stitch our hearts

For we are greater than our parts.

 

BEAUTIFUL

A Guest Post By Winter Chatman

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Author Winter Chatman

 

She be look’n at me like I ain’t nothin’

Cutt’n me down, My eyes have ears

I’m beautiful, you know? Really somethin’

 

Sixteen and pregnant , shoot, that ain’t nothin’

My life  My block  I have no fear

She be lookn’ at me like I ain’t nothin’

 

I ain’t cried, it ain’t no sin, nothin’

She can stare  My eyes have ears

I’m beautiful, you know? Really somethin’

 

I got straight A’s, that’s really somethin’

I ain’t stupid , you know, I can hear

She be look’n at me like I ain’t nothin

 

My college degree, that’s really something

For my life  From my block  That’s rare

I’m beautiful, you know, Really something

 

My Imani child grows, beautiful, really something

One flower in a bush so rare,

They keep looking at me like I am nothing

 

I am beautiful, you know, really something.

 

Penn State Literary Magazine 2003

 

 

 

 

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

Avner

Good Avner Noon

Resting on my Laurel

Blowing my Knose

Speak into the Mike

Lynn me a dollar

Paying a Bill

Ringing a Bell

Sitting on the John

Don’t Fall into the George Orwell all drown

Please help me I’m Pauline

Pauline in Love with you

Asimov Cocktail

Take my Rod and cue in

Taking down my Jeans

Care for a Garett Pat?

Just Kidding Billy!

My Precious Jules and Jims

Aldous Lang sang

Where are you Fromm Eric?

Pay the Feiffer!

My radiator is Lincoln

Sharon and Cher alike

Lisa House with an option to buy

Can Nabokov Drop?

What’s a Hemingway?

Oh, three or four pounds

I didn’t have any Joyce in the matter

Casting your Perls among Hamlets

Let Byrons be Byrons

Three pair of Keats

Where’s your Fishing Poe?

Did you Sartre the laundry?

Quit your Stalin and wash your Lenin

What kind of Fish?

Marlon Brand O

Hold the Mao, Hold the lettuce,

Special order Che Cherverez.

 

 

 

 

 

AMAZING SPACE

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AMAZING SPACE

Amazing Space, how sweet the ship

That saved my sanity

I once was straight but now I’m not

At last I’m totally free.

 

Twas space at first my mind did fear

In space it was I was stranded

How precious did that space appear

The hour that I landed.

 

Through many dangerous asteroids

I dodged far away from home

Tis space! I cried where I am bound

And space from where I come!

 

Falling fast through space I’m cast

Away headed straight for the sun

I’ll be there for 10,000 years

Unless alas it’s all undone.

 

 

 

 

 

Daddy’s Hands

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Daddy’s Hands

Daddy had a grip like steel

If he ever shook your hand you would surely know it

If he ever pulled you close you would surely feel it

He threw a horseshoe like a bullet from a gun

He served in tennis like a rabbit on the run

Whether it was a handsaw, a claw hammer, or a handgun,

He had a killer grip and the grip of a killer

And he could teach the hawk a few things about the handsaw.

Daddy’s hands.

 

Leda and The Swan

A Poem by William Butler Yeats

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Statue of Leda and the Swan in Rittenhouse Square, Philadelphia, Pennsylvanian

 

A sudden blow: the great wings beating still

Above the staggering girl, her thighs caressed

By the dark webs, her nape caught in his bill,

He holds her helpless breast upon his breast.

 

How can those terrified vague fingers push

The feathered glory from her loosening thighs?

And how can body, laid in that white rush,

But feel the strange heart beating where it lies?

 

A shudder in the loins engenders there

The broken wall, the burning roof and tower

And Agamemnon dead.

Being so caught up,

So mastered by the brute blood of the air,

Did she put on his knowledge with his power

Before the indifferent beak could let her drop?

Analysis

In this poem, W. B. Yeats tell the story of Leda and the Swan from Greek Mythology. The rape of the girl Leda by the god Zeus, who has taken the form of a swan.

Leda felt a sudden blow with the wings of the swan still beating above her. Her thighs were caressed by the dark webs of the swan’s feet. The nape of her neck was caught in his bill. He held her helpless breast upon his breast. How, Yeats asks, can Leda’s terrified vague fingers push the feathered glory of the swan from between her thighs? And, how can her body help but feel the strange heart beating where it lies? A shudder in the loins engenders the broken wall, the burning roof, and tower, and Agamemnon dead. The speaker wonders whether Leda, caught up by the swan and mastered by the brute blood of the air assumed his knowledge as well as his power before the indifferent beak could let her drop.

The poem is about a moment in time which ended the mythological age and began the modern era with the fall of Troy. This poem is a sonnet which is a 14 line poem in iambic pentameter.  The structure is Petrarchan. The Rhyme scheme is ABAB, CDCD, EFG, EFG.

According to Greek mythology, Zeus raped Leda who was married to King Tyndareus of Sparta. After the rape she slept with her husband. Subsequently she laid two eggs from which she hatched two set of twins: Helen and Pollux who were the children of Zeus and Castor and Clytemnestra who were the children of Tyndareus. This event, with the abduction of Helen, eventually brought about the Trojan War (the broken wall, the burning tower/ and Agamemnon dead). After the war, when King Agamemnon returned, Clytemnestra had her husband killed. According to Yeats’ interpretation, the lasting impact of the war was that it brought an end to the mythological era and gave birth to modern history.