The Traveler

Star Date 20172911

DSCN1982

Benn Bell, Nairobi, Kenya

“He did not think of himself as a tourist. He was a traveler. The difference was partly one of time. Whereas the tourist hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler, belonging to no more one place than to the next, moves slowly over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another. It would be very difficult indeed to tell anyone, of the many places he lived, precisely where he felt most at home.

Another important difference between the tourist and the traveler is that the former accepts his own civilization as his own without question; not so with the traveler, who compares it with the others and rejects those elements he finds not to his liking.”

-Paul Bowels, The Sheltering Sky

 

 

Elephant Walk

On Safari in Africa

On this spot in 1989 Kenya burned 12 tons of ivory worth over three million in U.S. dollars.

34225080970_36eb68664f_o

Nairobi National Park

According to then president Moi, “To stop the poacher the trader must be stopped and to stop the trader the final buyer must be convinced not to buy ivory.”

38521671041_fbd4aafc9b_o(1)

The tusks that were burned represents more than 2000 elephants  shot and killed over a four year period.

35519346830_7d1078eb13_o

Hotel Serena, Nairobi, Kenya

MATATUS

Public Transportation in Nairobi, Kenya

33697044873_6e427d9677_o

Busses in Nairobi are called Matatus. They are painted bight colors and are loud.

34400099351_e14d698334_o

70% of the population use them for transportation. They are cheap and convenient, but like everything else in Nairobi, they are chaotic.

34400105911_971742d654_o

The name comes from Swahili meaning three. It is unclear as to three what, but it is commonly  believed it refers to a coin worth about ten cents which would equate to 30 cents per ride.