Ajijic Day 5 & 6

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

Christmas Eve morning had breakfast in the Square with some of the boys. Bought a pocket knife for 60 pesos, which I’ll have to leave here. About three dollars USD. Walked back to the place to rest up, read, write, work on pictures, Facebook etc.

Went to the party at Kevin’s. Later that night people were exploding fire crackers all night long. Didn’t stop until 4 am.

Christmas morning had breakfast with Buddha at Scallions. Dinner party at Bruce’s at 4:00. In between I walked the streets.

Casablanca Hotel and Bogart’s Bar

I’m Dreaming of a White Christmas

Parallel Existence

On the street in Ajijic

Our Lady of Guadalupe

My Christmas Tree

My living room

Buddha at the Christmas Party.

Is he thinking, “Shall I kill something or go to an open mic? Which of these two things should I do?”

There was a woodcutting operation on one side of me. All day long cutting wood with a power saw.

There were fires in the street and fireworks all night long to celebrate Christmas.

Ajijic Day 5

Garden Party

I went to a garden party at Kevin’s. All the best people were there, including a past trade minister from Canada. I started off with a shot of tequila and a beer chaser. Moved on to eggnog which was heavy with rum, then finished off with a couple of glasses of Merlot.

“Doesn’t all that mixing bother you?” asked Alain?

“Never mix never worry,” I quoted Honey from Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf.

“Oh! I remember that movie!” Gushed Alain.

“Well, so far so good,” I said.

Happy New Year from Ajijic!

Today is New Year’s Day so I interrupt my narrative to wish all my WordPress friends and followers, HAPPY NEW YEAR!

And I’ll post a few of my favorite pictures from Ajijic.

Happy New Year from Benn and Anna

Celebrating New Year’s Eve with fires in in the street.

Sunset over Lake Chapala

Our Lady Of Guadalupe

Having fun on the Square

MEANDER

Word of the day: Meander

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I meandered five miles out one day along the way

 

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First I came to the place of the celestial fire

 

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A little further on a mighty fountain did I spy
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It rose and flowed into the the sacred River Sigh.

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A fitting day for fire and water I would say as I continued on along the way.  Around the bend I hit a wall

 

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But most certainly we don’t need a wall!

Is what I say

But it was a mighty fine day

Out walking along the way.

 

 

LUST

The editors of WordPress have chosen “Lust” as the word of the day for my daily inspiration. I am happy to accommodate them with my own interpretation and inspired rendering of this volatile, combustible, and knocked out loaded word.

I take you to the lust capitals of the world, two sister cites really, which gives an extra added dimension to the word lust, if you catch my meaning.

So here we have visual evidence of the lusty nature of these two great cities: Philadelphia and Paris.

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A Philly stripper goes into the Candy Store for stripper supplies.

 

“Of all the worldly Passions, lust is the most intense.”

-Buddha

 

 

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Purple Orchid, Philadelphia

“She was perfect, pure maddening sex, and she knew it, and she played on it, dripped it, and allowed you to suffer for it.”
–  Charles Bukowski

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Ozz Gentleman’s Club, Philadelphia

“Lust is the source of all our actions, and humanity.”
― Blaise Pascal

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Club Ozz, Philadelphia

“I live for sex. I celebrate it, and relish the electricity of it, with every fibre of my being. I can see no better reason for being alive.”
― Fiona Thrust

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Sex Shop on South Street in Philly

“The world is divided into those who screw and those who do not. He distrusted those who did not—when they strayed from the straight and narrow it was something so unusual for them that they bragged about love as if they had just invented it.”
― Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Love in the Time of Cholera

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Leather and Latex, Philly

 

“Lust’s Passion will be served; it demands, it militates, it tyrannizes.”

-Marquis de Sade

 

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Moulin Rouge in Paris where girls who can Cancan

“Lust is to the other passions what the nervous fluid is to life; it supports them all, lends strength to them all ambition, cruelty, avarice, revenge, are all founded on lust.”
–  Marquis de Sade

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Pussy’s Gentleman’s Club, Paris

“I can resit anything but temptation.”

– Oscar Wilde

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Sex Shop, Paris

“There’s something here, my dear boy, that you don’t understand yet. A man will fall in love with some beauty, with a woman’s body, or even a part of a woman’s body (a sensualist can understand that) and he’ll abandon his own children for her, sell his father and mother, and his country, Russia, too. If he’s honest, he’ll steal; if he’s humane, he’ll murder; if he’s faithful, he’ll deceive.”

-Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

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La Diva, Paris

 “Only the united beat of sex and the heart can create ecstasy.”

-Anais Nin

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New Girl’s, Paris

“To have her here in bed with me, breathing on me, her hair in my mouth – I count that as something of a miracle.”

-Henry Miller

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Paris Museum of Erotic Art

 

All photos by me.

 

The Gates of Hell

“Abandon hope all ye who enter here.”

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Th Gates of Hell, Auguste Rodin

The Gates of hell is a sculpture by Auguste Rodin that depicts a scene from Dante’s The Divine Comedy. There were three bronze casts made; they reside in The Musee Rodin in Paris, The Rodin Museum in Philadelphia, and the National Museum of Western Art in Ueno Park, Tokyo.

This photo was taken in Philadelphia.

Bridge

Benjamin Franklin Bridge, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

I have always loved bridges….I have been photographing them my whole life. This in one of my all time favorite bridges in the world which spans the Delaware River between Philadelphia and Camden. Informally it is known as the Ben Franklin Bridge.   Work began on January 6, 1922. At the peak of construction, 1,300 people worked on the bridge, and 15 died during its construction. The bridge opened to traffic on July 1, 1926, three days ahead of its scheduled opening on the nation’s 150th anniversary. At completion, its 1,750-foot span was the world’s longest suspension bridge.

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